Wednesday, October 31, 2012

i2P Expedition Africa Underway Today

A few weeks back I posted a story about impossible2Possible's next project, Expedition Africa. At the time, the team was still in the preparation phase for their adventure and the official website had just gone live. Now, the i2P team has assembled in Botswana and they are preparing to set out on their cross-country run today.

Much like past i2P endeavors, Expedition Africa will blend adventure, education and social awareness into one project. At its core, EA is about a team of youth ambassadors who will spend the next eight days running more than 400 km (248 miles) across the beautiful landscapes of Botswana. Much of the journey will take place in the Kalahari Desert. The eight young men and women who are undertaking this challenge will split into two groups of four, with the first group running the initial 200 km (124 mile) leg over four days, while the other four team members work as the support crew. At the halfway point of the expedition, the two teams will swap roles for the final 200 km stretch.

While they are in Botswana, the youth ambassadors will also learn about the importance of water to the people that live in the Kalahari, while investigating its importance on human development and biodiversity. The desert is one of the driest and most arid places on the planet, making water the most precious commodity there.

One of the hallmarks of any impossible2Possible expedition is the educational aspects that it provides. As with past i2P excursions, the members of Expedition Africa will also be interacting with classrooms to provide insights on the culture and landscapes of Botswana, the importance of clean water to developing nations and the pure adventure of running an ultramarathon through the desert. The i2P staff has carefully crafted a curriculum for students of all ages that will not only help them learn about the places the team is visiting but also inspire them for future adventures of their own.

To follow the expedition as it unfolds, visit the Expedition Africa website or follow the progress on Facebook or Twitter.

No comments: