Friday, June 20, 2014

Expedition Granted: Nat Geo Wants to Give You $50K to Make Your Dream Project a Reality

Do you have an idea for a big project thats been rolling around inside your head for awhile? Have something you'd like to accomplish, but just don't have the funding to start moving towards your goal? If so, National Geographic wants to hear about it, and possibly make it a reality. The organization that is synonymous with exploration and adventure has launched Expedition Granted with the purpose of making someone's big dream come true, and they're willing to give you $50,000 to make it happen.

Nat Geo has begun taking submissions for Expedition Granted, which they say isn't just for mountain climbers or adventure photographers. In fact, they're encouraging musicians, techies, engineers, and tinkerers to all submit their ideas for consideration.

The process is fairly straight forward, although you will need to have some technical acumen. First, you'll need to record a video (two minutes or less), explaining your project, and why you deserve to have your "expedition" – whatever that might be – funded. Once you have the video created, upload it on the Expedition Granted submissions page, fill out all of the online forms, and start sharing your idea on all of your social media outlets.

On June 23, Nat Geo will begin posting submissions to the Expedition Granted website, where they can be viewed and shared by the public. They'll continue to update the page, and post more projects, through the August 31 deadline. After that, judges at National Geographic will select ten finalists, and post them online on September 16. They'll be available for everyone to vote on through September 29, and on September 30, the winner will be announced.

That's all there is to it. So, start refining your idea, get working on that video, and submit your project soon. Who knows, you just might get $50,000 to fund your big idea.

Find out more at the Expedition Granted FAQ.

1 comment:

Dan V. said...

What a great opportunity for a teacher or a people and history person. Galileo's home and John Harrisons home and Isaac Newtons home are homes I would like to visit. They tie together nicely in the story of Longitude.